Ranking 187 Telescopes with Price Groups

We're of an opinion that anyone buying a telescope should save at least $200 by any means. If your budget is below $350, you're typically looking at entry-level telescopes that are portable and easy to use but can help to decide on whether you want to upgrade to something bigger. If you're serious about the hobby, you should bump up your budget to $350+ and it is, in fact, the price range that we recommend to most amateur astronomers. 8" Dobsonians, which costs around $600, are the most perfect choice for most of you. Astrophotography is even beyond this budget, for which you should look at $1000+ telescopes.
Caution
Despite the fact that Covid-19 hit two years ago, almost everything decent is either out of stock or costly as a result of the covid-related disruption in production lines combined with high consumer demand. Unfortunately, you'll have to place a backorder and wait many weeks to months for most scopes. Furthermore, because almost all telescopes have seen considerable price increases (30% to 50% on average) in the last 1-2 years, the price-related groups below may not be as useful as we intended when we first designed them. The last time this page was updated was in January 2022 (Update involved removing many of the discontinued Meade telescopes).
We recommend avoiding Amazon for larger telescopes ($300+) because online US telescope retailers provide superior technical and post-sales assistance, product choice, and pricing, as well as a better guarantee that you'll get what you paid for. Most $300+ telescopes come with two boxes containing the optical tube and base, and Amazon (or some of its third-party merchants) is infamous in the astronomy community for shipping only one of the two boxes occasionally. However, we still love Amazon for everything else, and we'd recommend it for accessories, lower-cost telescopes, and even $300+ telescopes if (and only if) the value and availability are appealing! High Point Scientific, AgenaAstro, Astronomics, and Orion's Telescope.com are all reputable US sellers with good shipping, refund, and financing options, and your shopping experience will be comparable to that of your typical Amazon purchases. Of all the US retailers, High Point Scientific, the largest internet telescope retailer in the United States, is the community favourite.
$100
$150
$200
$300
$400
$650
$850
$1250
$1750
$2000

Around ~$75

Telescopes below $100 have to make large concessions in quality and usefulness to the point that they’re little more than fun toys for casual glimpses at the Moon, planets, and other bright targets. However, if it’s all you can afford, the scopes below still beat having nothing. 
Best Value
Celestron Cometron Firstscope Tabletop Dobsonian
Rank 1
3.9/5
The Cometron FirstScope is similar to the Orion Funscope in terms of overall usefulness and sports largely the same optics and accessories, but uses an optical as opposed to a battery-powered red dot finder. This may make the scope a little more inconvenient to use, but reduces the cost by a small amount.
Rank 2
3.7/5
While not particularly useful overall, the Funscope 76 offers a super-cheap introduction to the world of astronomy and telescopes in a diminutive package. It’s not a serious observing tool by any means, but the FunScope comes with quality accessories and handles similarly to a much larger instrument.
National Park Foundation FirstScope Tabletop Dobsonian
Rank 3
3.5/5
The National Park Foundation FirstScope is the same basic telescope kit as the Cometron and Funscope 76mm tabletop telescopes, but lacks any finder at all - instead simply being aimed by sighting down the tube.
Rank 4
3.4/5
The basic bare-bones FirstScope will work okay, but lacks a finder or acceptable quality eyepieces. The views through this instrument at even low powers are mushy and the eyepieces feel like looking through a drinking straw.
Celestron FirstScope Moon Signature Tabletop Dobsonian
Rank 5
3.4/5
Identical to the Celestron Firstscope, but with a different optical tube decoration.
Rank 6Orion SpaceProbe II 76 Reflector3.7
Rank 7Zhumell 76 AZ Reflector3.7
Rank 8Celestron ExploraScope 70AZ Refractor3.7
Rank 9Celestron PowerSeeker 60 EQ
3.7
Rank 10Meade Adventure Scope 603.6
Rank 11Celestron ExploraScope 60 AZ3.6
Rank 12Zhumell Z603.6
Rank 13Celestron AstroMaster LT 60AZ3.6
Rank 14Orion Observer II 70mm AZ3.5
Rank 15Zhumell 60 AZ3.5
Rank 16Orion Observer II 60mm AZ3.5
Rank 17Zhumell Z50
3.2
Rank 18Celestron PowerSeeker 60 AZ
2.8
Rank 19Celestron Powerseeker 70AZ2.7
Rank 20Celestron Travel Scope 702.5
Rank 21Orion GoScope III 702
Rank 22Celestron PowerSeeker 50 AZ2
Rank 23Celestron Travel Scope 502

~$100 range

Telescopes in the $100 range are acceptable but tend to come with either a mediocre mounting, mediocre accessories, or some other major limitation hindering performance. 
Rank 1
4.45/5
The Zhumell Z100, unlike its smaller sub-$100 brethren, offers a truly parabolic primary mirror allowing for sharp images of the Moon, planets, and other targets at anything but the lowest powers. It’s also extremely portable, fitting in even a moderately sized backpack.
Rank 2
4.35/5
The SkyScanner has all of the same advantages and disadvantages of the Z100 and exactly the same optics, but includes a 20mm Kellner eyepiece (20x) instead of the Z100’s 17mm Kellner (24x) for low power.
Rank 3
3.3/5
The Sarblue Mak60 lacks aperture, but offers extremely high-quality optics in a telescope that quite literally fits in a cup holder, as well as an enjoyable educational experience.
Orion SkyScanner BL102mm
Rank 4
3.5/5
The SkyScanner BL102 has questionable optical quality, a mediocre build and eyepieces which are straight up junk. It's a strange, unusual, and sudden departure for a company known primarily for its high-quality Dobsonians.
Explore Scientific FirstLight 90mm Doublet Refractor with AZ Mount
Rank 5
3.15/5
x
Explore FirstLight 70mm Refractor with AZ Mount
Rank 6
2.95/5
x
Rank 7
2.9/5
The AstroMaster 76EQ isn't the biggest or best scope in its price range, but delivers sharp views on a relatively sturdy mount.
Orion SpaceProbe II 76 EQ Reflector
Rank 8
2.8/5
The SpaceProbe II has significantly less light-gathering ability than even a 70mm refractor, but offers potentially the sharpest images of any of the scopes in its price range. However, the mount is a little confusing for beginners and the included accessories are decidedly mediocre.
Rank 9
2.6/5
The PowerSeeker 80EQ is similar to the discontinued Meade Polaris 80EQ, but with far inferior eyepieces and a totally useless finderscope. However, it does have adjustable tube rings which allows one to balance and rotate the tube more freely.
Celestron PowerSeeker 80AZS Refractor
Rank 10
2.55/5
The PowerSeeker 80AZS is almost useless for planetary and lunar observing thanks to its high amounts of chromatic aberration and abysmal included 4mm eyepiece and Barlow, but makes for a great wide-field instrument for viewing large deep-sky objects.
Rank 8Celestron AstroMaster 76 EQ Reflector
3.8
Rank 9Celestron Inspire 70AZ Refractor
3.7
Rank 10Celestron PowerSeeker 70 EQ Refractor
3.7
Rank 11Orion Observer II 70mm EQ Refractor
3.7
Rank 12Celestron AstroMaster 70EQ Refractor
3.7
Rank 13Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Reflector3.6
Rank 14Explore Scientific FirstLight 90mm Doublet Refractor AZ Mount
3.6
Rank 15Celestron Powerseeker 114AZ3.6
Rank 16Celestron Travel Scope 80 Refractor
3.6
Rank 17Celestron Explorascope 80AZ Refractor
3.6
Rank 18Celestron AstroMaster 70AZ Refractor3.6
Rank 19Explore FirstLight 70mm Refractor AZ Mount
3.6
Rank 20Orion Observer 80ST EQ Refractor3.3
Rank 21Celestron AstroMaster LT 76AZ Reflector
3.2
Rank 22Celestron ExploraScope 114AZ Reflector
2.9
Rank 23Celestron AstroMaster LT 70AZ Refractor
2.9
Rank 24Zhumell Z70 Refractor
2.3

~$150 range

A budget of $150 will get you a workable telescope with few constraints that permanently hold it back, albeit with a few concessions on accessories. 
Rank 1
4.3/5
The Zhumell Z114 offers many of the same advantages as the Z100, but with a collimatable and slightly larger primary mirror offering sharper images and 30% more light gathering capability. It features the same red dot finder and 17mm/10mm Kellner eyepieces that are included with the Z100.
Explore One Aurora 114 Reflector
Rank 2
4/5
The Explore One Aurora 114 is marketed mainly towards kids, but makes for a surprisingly good scope for adults too - the optical tube is identical to the Zhumell Z114’s, the full-sized mount/tripod has slow-motion controls, and the included eyepieces are quite good. However, the Aurora’s red-dot finder is very poorly made, and overall the scope has a relatively cheap feel to its construction.
Orion VersaGo E-Series 90 Refractor
Rank 3
3.8/5
The VersaGo E-Series 90 is an acceptable choice for beginners, but we’re not impressed by its inclusion of a 45-degree erecting prism instead of a true star diagonal. Its unobstructed aperture means that it ends up offering similarly bright and sharp views as the Z114, albeit with the disadvantage of chromatic aberration on bright targets such as the Moon and planets. The included Plossl eyepieces are quite well-made - with a real star diagonal, the VersaGo 90 is quite the performer.
Celestron Cometron 114AZ Reflector
Rank 4
3.8/5
The Cometron 114AZ is simply a Z114/StarBlast optical tube perched atop a glorified photo tripod. While stable and of course quite capable of delivering sharp images, the lack of fine adjustment capability and the jerky motions of the mount make for a rather frustrating user experience out of the box.
Rank 5Celestron Inspire 80AZ Refractor
3.7
Rank 6AstroMaster 80AZS Reflector
3.7
Rank 7Celestron AstroMaster 90AZ Refractor
3.7
Rank 8StarSense Explorer LT 80AZ
3.6
Rank 9Orion GoScope 80 Refractor
3.3
Rank 10Levenhuk Skyline 120S Reflector
3
Rank 11StarSense Explorer LT 114AZ
2.8
Rank 12Celestron PowerSeeker 127EQ Reflector1

~$200 range

With a budget of $200 or more, you’ve got a lot more options for a good telescope, with fewer compromises to the quality of the instrument itself or its accessories. 
Rank 1
4.75/5
The Z130 is the best of the Zhumell tabletop Dobs, featuring even more aperture and a slower focal ratio of f/5 which makes it less demanding of collimation and eyepiece quality. Z130 comes with tube rings and a nicer focuser when compared to Heritage 130P. The only downside is that at over 20 pounds, you’ll be hard pressed to find a suitable surface for the scope to rest on.
Rank 2
4.75/5
The Heritage includes the same accessories and sports the same optics as the Z130, but features a collapsible tube that allows it to fit into a smaller space and reduces the weight by a bit when compared to Z130 which makes it a better choice for kids. This does create the disadvantage of stray light being able to easily enter the tube, which can be (mostly) remedied by creating a foam shroud. For an adult, the weight difference is insignificant.
Rank 3
4.25/5
While often recommended as a beginner telescope and indeed not a bad choice, the Orion StarBlast Astro is essentially identical to the cheaper Zhumell Z114, and offers no significant differences. At its price point, you’d be better served by the equatorially-mounted StarBlast II or one of the 130mm tabletop dobsonian reflectors.
Rank 4
4.1/5
The Orion StarBlast is essentially identical to the Zhumell Z114 optically, but on a different mounting. The StarBlast II version is perched atop a rather spindly EQ-1 equatorial mount. While there is a bit of a learning curve to using the EQ-1, you’re rewarded with a full-sized tripod, equatorial movements and the ability to upgrade to motorized tracking later on.
Rank 5
3.35/5
The StarMax 90’s Maksutov-Cassegrain design makes for an ultra-portable planetary scope with great performance and a convenience factor that can’t be matched, but offers lackluster views of deep-sky objects and the simple mounting may frustrate some users.
Explore Scientific FirstLight 114 EQ3 Reflector
Rank 6
2.95/5
x
Explore Scientific FirstLight 114 Twilight Nano Reflector
Rank 7
2.95/5
x
Orion Observer 134mm Reflector
Rank 8
2.8/5
x
Celestron Inspire 100AZ Refractor
Rank 9
2.75/5
The Inspire 100AZ is admittedly not our favorite choice in its price range due to the chromatic aberration but offers relatively sharp views and super-low maintenance, plus the potential for terrestrial viewing that reflectors lack. It also sports some nice conveniences such as a lens cap doubling as a smartphone adapter and some ergonomic improvements to the accessory tray, but has a significantly inferior mount and an often higher price tag than its competitor.
Rank 7Explore Scientific FirstLight 114 EQ3 Reflector3.8
Rank 8Celestron AstroMaster 90EQ Refractor
3.8
Rank 9Explore Scientific FirstLight 114 Twilight Nano Reflector3.7
Rank 10Celestron AstroMaster 130 EQ MD Reflector
3.6
Rank 11Celestron AstroMaster 130 EQ Reflector3.6
Rank 12Orion StarBlast 90 Refractor
3.6
Rank 13Celestron Ambassador 50 Table Top Refractor
3
Rank 14Celestron AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector2.7

~$300 range

Best Value
Skywatcher Heritage 150P Tabletop Dobsonian
Rank 1
4.3/5
The Heritage 150P is essentially a bigger version of the smaller 130mm Heritage, with the same user-friendly tabletop Dobsonian mount and collapsible tube but a bit more light gathering capability. While still a tabletop telescope, it packs great views in a package that can fit in almost any vehicle, storage space, or container.
Rank 2
4.05/5
The Orion XT4.5 may have less aperture than some of its cheaper rivals, but has an ultra-smooth true Dobsonian mount with real bearings, high-quality included Sirius Plossl eyepieces, and its long focal ratio makes it significantly easier to collimate. The scope’s long tube also means that it doesn’t necessarily need a full-height table or stool to be at a comfortable height for use - a milk crate or box will probably do.
Most Portable
Sky-Watcher Virtuoso 90 Catadioptric
Rank 3
4.1/5
The Virtuoso 90 is very similar in mechanics and performance to the Orion StarMax 90, but its motorized mount allows for hands-free automatic tracking, and makes for a fun platform to use for daytime panorama shots with a camera. The scope also includes a solar filter, making it a great platform for both day and night use.
Orion StarBlast 114mm Reflector
Rank 4
4/5
The StarBlast 114mm AutoTracker uses the same mount as the Virtuoso, but sports a 114mm reflector optical tube instead. Although superficially similar to the StarBlast 4.5 and Z114, the AutoTracker 114 is slightly longer in focal length (500mm vs. 450mm) and includes a collimation cap for easier collimation.
Best with Tripod
Orion SpaceProbe 130 EQ Reflector
Rank 5
3.9/5
The SpaceProbe 130EQ provides a decent amount of aperture on a sturdy EQ-2 mounting, but with a spherical f/6.7 primary mirror it provides less-than-sharp images at higher magnifications and the included Kellner eyepieces are rather substandard considering the scope’s price tag.

Product Unavailable

Rank 6
3.9/5
The AstroView 90’s long f/11 focal ratio makes for a great planetary scope with remarkably little chromatic aberration, and the included Sirius Plossl eyepieces provide crisp and sharp views. The scope’s EQ-2 mounting is also rock solid. However, the AstroView 90’s small aperture means it simply cannot compete in light grasp nor resolution with larger 114mm and 130mm reflectors, and it is outclassed in convenience by the 90mm Maksutov-Cassegrains at and below its price range.
Levenhuk Skyline Plus 130S Reflector
Rank 7
3.8/5
The SkyLine Plus 130S is little more than a rebranded SpaceProbe 130EQ with a significantly lower quality plastic 5x24 finderscope as opposed to the 130EQ’s 6x30, and a 2x Barlow tossed in. It’s not fabulous, but will do the job.
  • Rank 8 - Explore Scientific FirstLight AR102 Twilight Nano Refractor - 3.7
  • Rank 9 - Celestron AstroMaster 102AZ Refractor - 3.7
  • Rank 10 - Celestron 80 LCM GoTo Refractor - 3.2

~$400 range

A budget of $400 allows you to get into the full-sized 6” Dobsonians as well as a few computerized offerings. These are the entry-level into “grown-up” telescopes. 
Best Value
Apertura DT6
Dobsonian
Rank 1
4.75/5
The DT6 is essentially a Orion SkyLine 6 copy without the included 9mm eyepiece, meaning you’ll have to go shopping for an extra eyepiece or two if you want high-magnification views of the Moon, planets, double stars, and globular star clusters. The eyepiece of the DT6 is a good 25mm Plossl, whereas the Skywatcher Classic comes with "Super" Modified Achromats, though they do come with both a 25mm and a 10mm instead of only the 25mm.
Rank 2
4.55/5
The Sky-Watcher 6” Traditional - like all 6” Dobsonians - offers tremendous value and convenience. Unlike the SkyLine 6, the 6” Traditional sports a 2” rack-and-pinion focuser, enabling the use of 2” eyepieces down the line. But you don't really need a 2" eyepiece in a 6" f/8 telescope due to secondary mirror illumination.
Orion Skyline 6"
Dobsonian
Rank 3
4.45/5
The Orion SkyLine 6 provides some of the best value in its class. With an all-metal 1.25” Crayford focuser, high-quality 25mm (48x) and 9mm (133x), and a full-sized Dobsonian mount, you’re sure to get bright, sharp views of the heavens without having to deal with a tabletop mount nor a spindly tripod.
Rank 5
4.25/5
The XT6 is sometimes the cheapest 6” Dobsonian available, and performs just as well as its competitors, but has the worst value. With a plastic, 1.25”-only focuser and only a single eyepiece (25mm, 48x), by the time you get it up and running you’ll have spent significantly more money than if you’d just bought one of the other scopes in its price range, to begin with.
Rank 6
4.25/5
With its f/5 focal ratio, the StarBlast 6 provides a wider field of view and lower magnifications with a given eyepiece than the 6” f/8 Dobsonians listed above, but requires a rock-solid tabletop for use and has more stringent collimation requirements. At f/5, coma is noticeable, especially in wide-angle eyepieces, but it's not horrible for the price and portability.
With Max Accessories
Rank 4
4.15/5
The XT6 Plus includes more accessories than its competitors - a solar filter and 2x Barlow lens to complement its 25mm and 10mm eyepieces, and an attractive white trim - but its 1.25” focuser is all plastic, plus the scope has a steeper price tag than other 6” Dobsonians.
Explore FirstLight 100mm Mak-Cassegrain with Twilight Nano Mount
Rank 7
3.9/5
x
Explore FirstLight 100mm Mak EQ3
Rank 9
3.75/5
The Explore Scientific FirstLight 100mm Mak is a great lunar and planetary or “grab n’ go” scope thanks to its lightweight and ultra-compact form factor, and features some of the best optics possible for a scope in its size range. However, its included 25mm eyepiece (56x), star diagonal, and finderscope are rather sub-par, and the small aperture combined with the super-long focal ratio of f/14 means you won’t be viewing much in the way of deep-sky objects.
Rank 11
3.75/5
The Astro-Fi 102’s Maksutov-Cassegrain optical design makes for a compact package, but the scope’s long focal length and rather small aperture prevent the GoTo technology from being of much use, as the 102 is limited to only the Moon, planets, and the brightest deep-sky targets which are relatively easy to locate manually.
Celestron Astro Fi 90 Refractor GoTo
Rank 13
3.75/5
Like the other Astro-Fi telescopes, the Astro-Fi 90 is able to be completely controlled by your phone or smart device. The Astro-Fi 90 is lower on our list due to its small aperture and long focal length, which limits its target options to the point that the computerized mounting is of questionable usefulness, to begin with. The views you get would be similar to the views provided by manual scopes in the $150 range.
Sky-Watcher StarTravel 80 AZ-GTe Refractor
Rank 14
3.7/5
x
Explore FirstLight 80mm EQ3 Refractor
Rank 10
3.6/5
The FirstLight 80mm f/11 is a great scope optically, but suffers from the mediocre accessories of the other FirstLight scopes and a relatively small aperture of only 80mm, making it a poor choice for deep-sky viewing.
Rank 8
3.55/5
The SpaceProbe 130ST is just a Z130/Heritage (our $200 picks) optical tube placed atop an EQ-2 equatorial mount, and includes high-quality Sirius Plossl eyepieces. While perhaps not the largest nor most advanced scope in its price range, the 130ST is a great platform for beginners and can be easily upgraded to motorized, hands-free tracking later on.
Sky-Watcher StarTravel 102 AZ3 Refractor
Rank 12
3.5/5
x
Celestron Nexstar 90SLT Mak GoTo
Rank 16
3.25/5
The NexStar 90SLT is not a bad scope and features an acceptable mount and accessories along with great optics, but setting up and aligning the mount is time-consuming and quite frankly overkill for a small instrument that’s almost exclusively useful for the Moon and planets.
Explore FirstLight 102mm Doublet Refractor with EXOS EQ Nano
Rank 15
3/5
x
Solomark Polaris 130EQ Reflector
Rank 17
2.5/5
The Polaris 130EQ is essentially a cheapened version of the SpaceProbe 130ST, with a Moon filter and Barlow lens included on top of the (mediocre) 25mm and 10mm eyepieces, and a slightly lower quality 6x30 finderscope compared to the 130ST’s.
Rank 14Sky-Watcher StarTravel 80 AZ-GTe Refractor3.7
Rank 15Sky-Watcher StarTravel 102 AZ3 Refractor
3.7
Rank 16Celestron 114 LCM GoTo Reflector3

~$550 - $800 range

In this budget, you can get an 8″ Dobsonian which is the best balance of aperture, portability, affordability, and simplicity for a beginner. Below 8″, you start to lose enough light-gathering ability to resolve much (though 6″ isn’t a horrible start, if that’s all you can do, the 8″ is definitely a better way to go). Most of the scopes we recommend in this category are well made enough to last you a lifetime, such as the 8” Dobsonians and various 5” and 6” tripod-mounted reflectors. 8″ Dobsonians are usually the most recommended in astronomy forums for beginners and hobbyists. 
Rank 1
4.9/5
GSO-made 'best bang for your buck' offering from HighPointScientific, the most popular US telescope retailer. It's optically and functionally the same as the Zhumell Z8/Orion Skyline 8", but often priced lower. Z8 and AD8 have the exact same set of eyepieces, focuser, altitude bearing, and finderscope. As of April 2022, AD8 is the least expensive of the three options, and HighPointScientific's assistance makes it superior in every way.
Rank 2
4.9/5
Produced by the same company GSO, the Zhumell Z8 is the exact replica of Apertura AD8 and is optically similar to Orion Skyline 8". If you can't get hold of Apertura AD8 for some reason, Zhumell Z8 is the clear 8" Dobsonian of choice.
Runner Up
Orion Skyline 8" Dobsonian
Rank 3
4.6/5
Other than the branding, altitude bearings, and accessories, the Skyline 8" is the same scope as AD8/Z8 and is made by GSO as well. Orion's extreme price markup because of their brand name makes it the best pick only if the Apertura AD8 or Zhumell Z8 is not available.
Budget Pick
Apertura DT8 Dobsonian
Rank 4
4.5/5
The DT8, like the XT8, is a solid choice for beginners but needs a high-magnification eyepiece for optimal planetary/lunar views and the price is a bit steep considering the lack of accessories.
Rank 5
4.45/5
Sky-Watcher's 8” Traditional is usually the cheapest 8" Dobsonian available in the US and comes with the bare essentials to get started, but its straight-through finderscope is uncomfortable to use and the included eyepieces are decidedly mediocre.
Rank 6
4.35/5
The plain Orion XT8 is a nice scope, but needs some extra accessories - or at least a high-magnification eyepiece - to unlock its full capabilities, and by the time you invest in such an upgrade you could’ve just bought a scope with even more included out of the box.
Rank 7
4.3/5
The XT8 Plus features a bundle of extra accessories such as 2x Barlow lens and a solar filter which are not present in the Z8/AD8/Skyline 8, but lacks the cooling fan, right-angle finderscope, and laser collimator of the GSO 8”(Z8, AD8, Skyline 8) or the right-angle finderscope of Sky-Watcher Flextube.

Product Unavailable

Most Compact 8" Dob
Sky-Watcher 8 Flextube Collapsible Dobsonian
Rank 8
4.2/5
The 8” Flextube’s collapsible tube is nice for those needing the most compact 8" dobsonian possible, but comes at the cost of a higher weight, more frequent collimation and stray light issues. It also lacks the dual-speed focuser of some of its competitors(Z8, AD8, Skyline 8, XT8 Plus) which by itself is a $100 accessory.
Rank 9
4.2/5
While lesser in aperture than similarly-priced offerings, the StarBlast 6i’s tremendously wide field of view and its IntelliScope PushTo system makes locating deep-sky objects an absolute breeze, and the included accessories are decent too.
Rank 10
4.17/5
The Astro-Fi 130 is optically identical to the 130ST and Z130, but sports a 2” plastic rack-and-pinion focuser. The Astro-Fi’s fully computerized GoTo mount is controlled by your phone or tablet, and will automatically slew to and track almost any object you choose. However, the scope is a bit of a battery guzzler and the free SkyPortal app is lacking - for optimal use you’ll need a rechargeable power supply and a copy of SkySafari Pro, both of which increase the price of this gizmo by quite a bit.