Ranking 58 Computerized Telescopes (GoTos and PushTos)

Our team of experts has reviewed, rated, and ranked around 58 computerized (GoTo & PushTo) telescopes they have either owned or used at least once. Price classification is based on the average cost at the time of publishing. The current rate might be slightly different from the price groups in which the scope is in.
$300
$450
$600
$750
$900
$1000
$1350
$1750

~$300 range

Being the starting point for computerized scopes, almost all of the telescopes in this price category have such small apertures that they tend to be severely limited in target options to the point that the computerized mounting is of questionable usefulness to begin with. The views you get would be similar to the ones provided by manual scopes in the $100-$150 price range and are constrained to the Moon, planets, and the brightest deep-sky targets – all of which are relatively easy to locate manually.
Rank 1
3.8
The Astro-Fi 102’s Maksutov-Cassegrain optical design makes for a compact package, and delivers a decent amount of performance. However, 102mm of aperture with an f/13 focal ratio means you’ll struggle to see much of anything that makes the GoTo technology worthwhile. Astro-Fi is cheaper because it doesn't need a keypad unlike Nexstar, and is controlled via a smartphone or tablet,
Celestron Nexstar 90SLT Mak GoTo
Rank 2
3.7
The NexStar 90SLT is not a bad scope and features an acceptable mount and accessories along with great optics, but simply can’t show you many targets that the electronics are actually necessary to locate for you.
Celestron Astro Fi 90 Refractor GoTo
Rank 3
3.7
The Astro-Fi 90 has relatively modest aperture and is not a great match for its rather lightweight GoTo mount. It also suffers from a fair amount of chromatic aberration due to being an inexpensive achromatic refractor.
Rank 4
3.7
The ETX-80 is extremely portable, lightweight, and offers full GoTo and a super-wide field of view, but its low build quality and tiny aperture render it little more than a fun toy with little in the way of actual performance.
Item discontinued. Last stocks left
Meade Starnavigator NG 90 GoTo Mak
Rank 5
3.6
The StarNavigator 90 Mak’s small aperture and ultra-long focal length make it a poor choice for a GoTo mount, and the lousy build quality and accessories mean it’s a terrible option for its price range.
Not Recommended
Meade Starnavigator NG 90 GoTo Refractor
Rank 6
3.5
The StarNavigator 90 has a poor build quality, significant chromatic aberration, and a poorly-made mount making it an outright bad choice.
Not Recommended
Celestron 80 LCM GoTo Refractor
Rank 7
3.2
The Celestron 80 LCM has decent optics, but its small aperture doesn’t deliver much with regards to deep-space views, and the mount is rather poorly constructed.
Not Recommended
Rank 8
3
The Celestron 114 LCM’s Bird-Jones optical design and lousy mounting make it a spectacularly bad choice for beginners and experienced users alike, delivering mushy views on a wobbly and easily-broken computerized mount with poor accuracy.
Not Recommended
Meade StarNavigator NG 114 GoTo Reflector
Rank 9
3
Like its Celestron counterpart the 114LCM, the StarNavigator NG 114 is a Bird-Jones, which are nearly impossible to collimate and deliver less-than-sharp views even if collimated correctly. And as with all of the StarNavigator NG scopes, the included mount is poorly made and struggles to provide adequate support for the telescope or ease of use for beginners.
Not Recommended

~$450 range

The computerized telescopes in the $450 price range tend to be well-made, but have apertures of between 4 and 6 inches, making the usefulness of a computerized system still questionable, if at least somewhat useful.
Rank 1
4.2
The Astro-Fi’s fully computerized GoTo mount is controlled by your phone or tablet, and will automatically slew to and track almost any object you choose. However, the scope is a bit of a battery guzzler and the free SkyPortal app is lacking - for optimal use you’ll need a rechargeable power supply and a copy of SkySafari Pro, both of which increase the price of this gizmo by quite a bit.
Orion StarSeeker IV 130mm Reflector GoTo
Rank 2
4
The StarSeeker IV 130mm features full GoTo, but unlike most computerized telescopes it can be pushed around manually without ruining the GoTo alignment - a huge plus. It can also be controlled via SkySafari just like the Celestron Astro-Fi telescopes. However, the included accessories are rather sub-par.
Rank 3
4
The NexStar 127SLT’s long focal ratio and limited aperture (120mm as measured by our experts; a bit less than the claimed 127mm) makes it less-than-ideal for viewing deep-sky objects, but it’s a great performer on the Moon and planets.
Rank 4
3.9
The StarSeeker IV 150mm Reflector has a fair amount of aperture and an advanced mount, but falls short of providing user-friendliness with its lack of collimation ability.
Rank 5
3.9
The NexStar 130SLT is a decent telescope, but its tripod legs are not the best, and for less money you could get the Astro-Fi 130 which has the same views but is more stable and easier to align and control.
Rank 6
3.9
The NexStar 4SE is sturdy, well-mounted and features great optics. However, Celestron severely overpromises on its astrophotography capabilities, and the 4SE’s mere 102mm of aperture combined with its long focal ratio of f/13 makes it a poor choice for viewing deep-sky objects, which is primarily what the GoTo mount is useful for.
Orion StarSeeker IV 114mm Reflector GoTo
Rank 7
3.9
The 114mm StarSeeker IV offers the same flexibility in its mount control options as the 130mm StarSeeker IV, but the significant aperture reduction warrants question as to how worthwhile the GoTo system really is.
Rank 8
3.7
The NexStar 102SLT suffers from a lot of chromatic aberration thanks to being a short refractor, and is on a less-than-sturdy mount for its size. However, it does deliver pleasing wide-field deep-sky views at low magnifications.
Not Recommended
Rank 9
3.7
The ETX-90 Observer is jam-packed with features and great optics, but it’s rather expensive and has only 90mm of aperture, making it less a useful telescope and more of a gizmo-laden toy similar to its smaller sibling the ETX-80.
Not Recommended
Meade StarNavigator NG 125 Maksutov GoTo
Rank 10
3.6
The StarNavigator NG 125 has great optics and a decent amount of aperture, but is paired with a wholly inadequate mount to properly support it.
Not Recommended
Rank 11
3.6
The StarNavigator 102 is similar to the NexStar 102SLT in its performance, as well as its inadequate mounting, albeit with inferior accessories and a less user-friendly interface.
Not Recommended
Meade Starnavigator NG 130 Reflector GoTo
Rank 12
3.5
The StarNavigator 130 has decent optics, but is undermounted, less easy to use, and overpriced compared to its Celestron 130mm equivalents.
Not Recommended

PushTo

4.4
While lesser in aperture than similarly-priced offerings, the StarBlast 6i’s tremendously wide field of view and its IntelliScope PushTo system makes locating deep-sky objects an absolute breeze, and the included accessories are decent too.
4
The StarSense Explorer DX 130AZ uses the same optical tube as the Astro-Fi 130 and other 130mm f/5 telescopes, but is mounted atop Celestron’s StarSense Explorer mount which assists in locating targets with your smartphone. However, the Astro-Fi 130 is similar in price and offers full tracking and GoTo, which is vastly preferable to the simple Push-To system of the DX 130AZ.
4
Like the DX130AZ, the StarSense Explorer DX102AZ has a smartphone-aided PushTo system that allows you to easily locate almost any object in the sky. However, with a relatively small aperture and a price tag big enough to obtain a larger and/or fully computerized instrument, it is not the most economically justifiable scope.

~$600 range

The 5-8” scopes in this price range are able to show you a wealth of deep-sky objects, and make excellent choices for a beginner or for an experienced user looking for a smaller and more convenient or portable instrument.
Rank 1
4.1
The NexStar 5SE is significantly more capable than its smaller counterpart the 4SE, with 5 inches of aperture and a more reasonable focal ratio of f/10. However, it is still limited by its rather small objective along with its cumbersome mounting and relative lack of accessories.
Orion StarSeeker IV 127mm Mak GoTo
Rank 2
4
The StarSeeker IV 127mm performs similarly to the NexStar 127SLT, but its mounting is more stable and capable of manual movement as well as being controlled via your phone, tablet, or other smart device. Whether that’s worth the significant price hike is up to you.
Orion StarSeeker IV 102mm Mak GoTo
Rank 3
4
The StarSeeker IV 102mm is functionally identical to the Astro-Fi 102 apart from its dual encoder system that allows the telescope to be moved manually. We’d recommend getting one of the larger reflectors or the 127mm Maksutov-Cassegrain instead of this one, though the 102 isn’t necessarily a bad telescope - just a bit expensive for what it offers.
Meade ETX125 Observer Mak GoTo
Rank 4
3.9
The ETX-125 Observer is a decent scope, but has a narrower field of view, more mediocre user interface, and less versatile mounting than the various NexStar, Astro-Fi, and StarSeeker Maksutov and Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope configurations available at equal or lower prices.
Rank 5
3.6
The SkyProdigy 130 is functionally identical to the NexStar 130SLT, but features Celestron’s StarSense auto-aligning technology built into the mount. However, not only is the StarSense wholly unnecessary and responsible for raising the price of the telescope significantly, but it is prone to malfunctions and rarely operates as desired.
Not Recommended

PushTos

4.4
The XT8i’s Intelliscope system allows for easy, seamless location of deep-sky objects - though it doesn’t automatically slew the telescope to them nor track for you. If you’re feeling adventurous, the scope can just be used manually like any other Dob.

~$750 range

The 5-8” scopes in this price range are able to show you a wealth of deep-sky objects, and make excellent choices for a beginner or for an experienced user looking for a smaller and more convenient or portable instrument.
Rank 1
4.2
The NexStar 6SE has enough aperture that it really begins to be able to take advantage of all that the computerized GoTo technology has to offer. It’s also remarkably compact.
Meade 5" LX65 Maksutov GoTo
Rank 2
4
The 5” LX65 has sharp optics and is on a well-made mount, but the NexStar 6SE is lighter, around the same price, and offers equally good planetary and vastly superior deep-sky views.

~$900 range

The 610” scopes in this price range are quite capable and well-made, with few compromises in their build or image quality. You’ll be quite satisfied with any of these options.

GoTos

Meade 6" Lx65 ACF Catadioptric GoTo
Rank 1
4.2
The 6” LX65 has considerably sharper views near the edge of its field of view than the NexStar 6SE thanks to its ACF design, and a considerably heavier-duty mount. However, the user interface is a bit more outdated and challenging to master than the more beginner-friendly NexStar, and the unit is quite a bit heavier.
Celestron Advanced VX Series 6" Newtonian
Rank 2
4.1
While a little cumbersome and complicated to set up for visual use, the Advanced VX 6” Newtonian makes for a quality plug-and-play deep-sky astrophotography telescope (albeit less capable than an a-la-carte rig with a better mount such as the Sky-Watcher HEQ5), and offers decent lunar, planetary, and deep-sky views with its 6 inches of aperture.
Meade 6" LX65 Maksutov GoTo
Rank 3
4
The Maksutov version of the 6” LX65 possesses a narrower field of view but slightly sharper images and a lower price tag compared to the ACF scope.
Rank 4
3.8
The 150mm Maksutov optical tube is getting a little big for the rather light-duty StarSeeker IV mount and offers a narrower field of view than a 6” Schmidt-Cassegrain at a higher price,
Not Recommended
Celestron SkyProdigy 6 SCT GoTo
Rank 5
3.7
The Celestron SkyProdigy 6 has great optics, sporting the same C6 optical tube as the NexStar Evolution and SE 6” models, but is inadequately mounted - furthermore, the built-in StarSense technology is buggy and hardly ever works as advertised.
Not Recommended

PushTos

Best PushTo
Orion SkyQuest XT10i Dobsonian PushTo
Rank 5
4.6
Like the other XTi scopes, the XT10i’s Intelliscope system aids in aiming the scope to thousands of deep-sky targets. The XT10i’s large cutouts in the base also greatly aid in overall portability and reduce the weight of the scope, making it an improvement over regular 10” Dobs even if you don’t plan on utilizing the Intelliscope system particularly often.

~$1000 range

At $1000 or above, you’re essentially making no sacrifices in aperture by purchasing a computerized telescope, as most tend to be 8” or larger.

GoTos

Best GoTo
Sky-Watcher 8" Flextube SynScan Collapsible Dobsonian GoTo
Rank 1
4.5
The Skywatcher 8" Collapsible GoTo features full GoTo, but can be pushed around manually with or without aligning the GoTo system - and without disrupting the alignment of said GoTo system. It can even be controlled via your phone or tablet with the SynScan Pro app or SkySafari. The GoTo 8” Collapsible is more or less a regular 8” Collapsible with the SynScan system.
Orion SkyQuest XT8g Dobsonian GoTo
Rank 2
4.5
The XT8g features full GoTo and also has the same dual-speed focuser as the higher-end 8” manual Dobsonians on our list. The XT8g is more or less a regular XT8 with the same SynScan system as the Skywatcher 8" Collapsible GoTo, but with the XT8g’s dual-speed focuser.
Rank 3
4.1
The NexStar 8SE is a little undermounted, but provides great views of the Moon, planets, and deep-sky objects. If portability is not a concern, however, we’d recommend going with the easier-to-use and more stable GoTo 8” Dobsonians or a larger manual or computer-assisted Dobsonian on our list.
Celestron Advanced VX Series 8" Newtonian
Rank 4
4.1
The 8” Advanced VX Newtonian is pushing the mount’s capabilities to deliver good tracking for long exposures, but still works acceptably for astrophotography - though the 6” model, or alternatively an HEQ5, Atlas, or Sirius mount would probably be a better choice. As with the 6”, the scope can be used for visual astronomy with an eyepiece but is rather cumbersome for the job.

~$1350 range

GoTos

Best Dob GoTo
Sky-Watcher 10" Collapsible Dobsonian GoTo
Rank 1
4.6
Featuring full GoTo and a collapsible tube, the 10” Collapsible is a great option for beginners and experienced users alike. Like most GoTo Dobsonians, the 10” Collapsible can be operated completely manually should you not want to use the GoTo system, and it can be adjusted manually without upsetting the GoTo alignment.
Orion SkyQuest XT10g Dobsonain GoTo
Rank 2
4.6
The XT10G is basically identical in operation to the 10” Collapsible GoTo, but of course lacks the collapsible tube - and features a dual-speed focuser, unlike the Collapsible.
Best Compact GoTo
Celestron NexStar Evolution 6 Schmidt-Cassegrain GoTo
Rank 3
4.3
The NexStar Evolution 6 is jam-packed with features, including a built-in WiFi control module for operation via a smartphone or tablet, a built-in rechargeable lithium ion battery.
Celestron Advanced VX Series 6" Refractor GoTo
Rank 4
4
The 6” Advanced VX Refractor suffers from some chromatic aberration, and is certainly not the astrophotography-ready platform that marketing material might suggest. It’s a great choice for those who want a big refractor, though you might want to ponder what it is that’s so appealing about such a rig before purchasing.

PushTos

Orion SkyQuest XT12i Dobsonian PushTo
Rank 2
4.6
While possessing the same massive size as the AD12 and its rebranded variants, the XT12i features Orion’s Intelliscope system like its smaller brethren, and comes with cutouts in the base which greatly enhance portability.

~$1750 range

GoTos

Rank 1
4.5
The 8” Evolution has the same bells and whistles as the 6”, but with more aperture - and is a substantially steadier and more well-made scope than its cheaper cousin, the NexStar 8SE.
Orion Atlas 8 EQ-G Reflector GoTo
Rank 2
4.4
The Atlas 8 is absolutely overkill for visual astronomy, but makes for a great beginner astrophotography setup if an autoguider and coma corrector are added.
Rank 3
4.3
The 8” Advanced VX Schmidt-Cassegrain makes for a surprisingly portable setup, and is especially good for planetary imaging. However, the Advanced VX is simply not up to the task of supporting the 8” Schmidt-Cassegrain optical tube for deep-sky astrophotography - nor is a C8 an ideal first astrophotography scope.
Orion Sirius ED80 EQ-G Refractor GoTo
Rank 4
4.2
The Sirius ED80 is a great scope for astrophotography - though you could probably assemble a better rig if you shop a la carte. However, its extremely cumbersome mount and small aperture make it nearly useless for visual astronomy.
Celestron CPC 800 GPS SCT GoTo
Rank 5
4.1
The CPC 800 is a little less fancy than the 8” NexStar Evolution, but comes on a beefier mount and can be used for astrophotography on an equatorial wedge (sold separately).

PushTos

4.6
The XX12i functions similarly to the Meade Lightbridge 12 but features Orion’s Intelliscope Push-To system like the smaller XTi scopes in Orion’s catalog.

$2000+ range

Orion SkyQuest XX12g Dobsonian GoTo
Rank 1
4.6
The XX12g is identical to the XX12i, but with full GoTo as opposed to the Intelliscope system. It’s probably the most rewarding scope to use of all the ones we recommend on our list. Larger and more expensive GoTo Dobsonians exist, but we’d recommend sticking with a 12” or smaller scope to start with.
Sky-Watcher 12" Flextube Dobsonian GoTo
Rank 2
4.6
The 12” Flextube is a little more cumbersome than the XX12g, but considerably simpler to set up for each use - it’s best if you have a minivan or truck to transport it, however - or if you can store and roll it out of a garage.
Orion Sirius EQ-G GoTo 180mm Maksutov GoTo
Rank 3
4.3
7” Maksutovs are a bit of a specialty project - mainly useful for lunar and planetary viewing - but the Sirius 180mm is a great pick - not only does it have great optics, but the Sirius EQ-G mount is great for astrophotography with a smaller and shorter telescope later on.
Celestron Advanced VX 700 Mak GoTo
Rank 4
4.2
The Advanced VX 700 is identical optically to the Sirius 180mm, but the mount is a little more beefy - at the expense of being slightly less well-suited for astrophotography with another telescope.
Orion Atlas 10 EQ-G Reflector GoTo
Rank 5
4.1
The Atlas 10 provides great deep-sky views and with some patience can be configured for deep-sky astrophotography. However, it is incredibly cumbersome and absolutely nightmarish to set up, arguably belonging in some sort of permanent observatory or at least stored in a way that it can be rolled outside fully assembled.
Celestron 9.25" NexStar Evolution Schmidt Cassegrain GoTo
Rank 6
4
The 9.25” NexStar Evolution is an extremely massive setup - as bulky as the 12” Dobsonians on our list. However, it’s got all of the same features as the Evolution 8 with just a bit more aperture - all perched atop a super-heavy-duty tripod.
Orion SkyView Pro 180 EQ Mak GoTo
Rank 7
3.7
Not Recommended